• 46°

Students get career advice

 

Jemison Mayor Eddie Reed was one of three city officials who spoke to Jemison High School’s career awareness class Friday.
The mayor, a former educator at Jemison for many years, urged the students to strive for their goals both now while in high school and after graduation.
“We are living in a changing world. It is transforming rapidly every day,” Reed told the students. “Eighty percent of all jobs in the future will require an education beyond high school.”
Reed said America and the world are re-tooling because the way our parents and grandparents made a living is quickly disappearing. This is a result of the dehumanization of society through advancements in technology. One example is a cashier being replaced by a computer.
Some fields, he added, such as law enforcement, medical, science and even municipal government, will always have a need for people. Reed encouraged the students to keep these things in mind.
“Every day, you make a decision. Every decision you make in either a positive or negative way will affect you for the rest of your life,” Jemison Police Chief Shane Fulmer told the group.
Fulmer also stressed the importance of setting personal goals within one’s career.
“I reached for the sky,” he said. “I didn’t want to just come into this profession and be there.”
Shannon Welch, the mayor’s administrative assistant and one of the youngest city officials, also spoke to the class. 
In his position, Welch assists the mayor in everyday activities runnng the city.
“I liked city government, so that’s what I went into,” Welch said.
The men opened up the floor afterward for questions. 
The school thanked them for their time with the students.
Jemison Mayor Eddie Reed was one of three city officials who spoke to Jemison High School’s career awareness class Friday.
The mayor, a former educator at Jemison for many years, urged the students to strive for their goals both now while in high school and after graduation.
“We are living in a changing world. It is transforming rapidly every day,” Reed told the students. “Eighty percent of all jobs in the future will require an education beyond high school.”
Reed said America and the world are re-tooling because the way our parents and grandparents made a living is quickly disappearing. This is a result of the dehumanization of society through advancements in technology. One example is a cashier being replaced by a computer.
Some fields, he added, such as law enforcement, medical, science and even municipal government, will always have a need for people. Reed encouraged the students to keep these things in mind.
“Every day, you make a decision. Every decision you make in either a positive or negative way will affect you for the rest of your life,” Jemison Police Chief Shane Fulmer told the group.
Fulmer also stressed the importance of setting personal goals within one’s career.
“I reached for the sky,” he said. “I didn’t want to just come into this profession and be there.”
Shannon Welch, the mayor’s administrative assistant and one of the youngest city officials, also spoke to the class. 
In his position, Welch assists the mayor in everyday activities runnng the city.
“I liked city government, so that’s what I went into,” Welch said.
The men opened up the floor afterward for questions. 
The school thanked them for their time with the students.